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Herculaneum IV.6. Casa della Fullonica, linked to IV.5 and IV.7

 

Herculaneum IV.6. Plan of the Casa della Fullonica.
See Pesando, F. and Guidobaldi, M.P. (2006). Pompei, Oplontis, Ercolano, Stabiae. Editori Laterza, (p. 335)

Herculaneum IV.6. Plan of the Casa della Fullonica.

See Pesando, F. and Guidobaldi, M.P. (2006). Pompei, Oplontis, Ercolano, Stabiae. Editori Laterza, (p. 335)

 

According to Maiuri, this was a modest dwelling, perhaps inhabited by a family of shopkeepers or artisans. The front part was used for the exercise of the business and the more private rear portion formed the living quarters. On one side of the entrance corridor is a simple workroom, IV.5, and on the other a shop IV.7.

 

Behind the shop in the covered atrium, there is a typical installation of podia and tanks for the washing of clothes.

At the end of the atrium, there is a larger room (the triclinium) and an apothecary; behind these, arranged around another atrium with an impluvium tank, are the few other ground floor rooms.

The two rooms at the end, with the original barrel-vaulting, good opus signinum flooring with sections in marble opus sectile and lit by circular windows, still preserve the remains of a nobler, more antique decoration of the I style in the fine stucco cornice with dentils and in the mouldings of the lunette of the vault.

See Maiuri, Amedeo, (1977). Herculaneum. 7th English ed, of Guide books to the Museums Galleries and Monuments of Italy, No.53 (p.30-1).

 

Pesando and Guidobaldi wrote that the conventional name of this house was derived from the laundry that was installed in the north-west corner of the atrium during the last years of the life of this house, where two basin/tanks for the washing of the cloth are preserved. There are two consecutive atria, the first Testudinate, the second Tuscanic. There were also rooms on an upper floor, but the extent of these are not certain, but they certainly extended above the rooms 1 and 3, at the front of the dwelling.

 

Room 1, atrium testudinate, onto which opens the large receiving room (4) originally the tablinum, and the storeroom (5), obtained from a previous adaptation, analogous to the corridor (6) which leads to the rear section of the house, centred on the Tuscanic atrium (8). Here is preserved the impluvium basin in cocciopesto with two cistern mouths. On the north side is an exedra (7) and a vaulted diaeta (9) with pavement in cocciopesto with marble inserts and with a rough closing wall on the side of the atrium, intended evidently to protect the room from the trickle of rain water flowing in the impluvium. On the east side of the atrium were the rooms of major importance – the two oeci with barrel-vaults (10 and 11) with remains of original wall decorations in first style, and floors of cocciopesto with central panel in opus sectile.

See Pesando, F. and Guidobaldi, M.P. (2006). Pompei, Oplontis, Ercolano, Stabiae. Editori Laterza, (p. 335)

 

Ins. IV.6, Herculaneum, September 2015. Entrance doorway on east side of Cardo IV Inferiore.

IV.6, Herculaneum, September 2015. Entrance doorway on east side of Cardo IV Inferiore.

 

IV.6, on right, Herculaneum, September 2015. Entrance doorway on east side of Cardo IV Inferiore.  Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

IV.6, on right, Herculaneum, September 2015. Entrance doorway on east side of Cardo IV Inferiore.

Photo courtesy of Michael Binns.

 

Herculaneum Casa della Fullonica August 2013 Ferebee P1210583

IV.6 Herculaneum. August 2013.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

Herculaneum Casa della Fullonica August 2013 Ferebee P1210584

IV.6 Herculaneum. August 2013.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

Herculaneum Casa della Fullonica August 2013 Ferebee P1210585

IV.6 Herculaneum. August 2013.

Photo courtesy of Buzz Ferebee.

 

The two rooms at the end, with the original barrel-vaulting, good opus signinum flooring with sections in marble opus sectile and lit by circular windows, still preserve the remains of a nobler, more antique decoration of the I style in the fine stucco cornice with dentils and in the mouldings of the lunette of the vault.

See Maiuri, Amedeo, (1977). Herculaneum. 7th English ed, of Guide books to the Museums Galleries and Monuments of Italy, No.53 (p.30-1).